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by Melissa Karnaze

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In "Analyzing What Robots Tell Us About Human Nature BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION, ," The Sims creator Will Wright describes how robots will need human capabilities in order to function in the real world.

One such ability is filtering information from the environment. PAXIL no rx, You have to filter important information to survive

Because, well -- there's a lot of information out there.

Wright says:

"If you actually look at the amount of data coming in through all your senses, my PAXIL experience, there's something like 100 million bits of information coming in every second through your visual system and another 10 million bits coming through your auditory system and another one million bits coming through your tactile system."

Emotional reactions act as a filtering process

Between the lines, Online PAXIL without a prescription, what Wright's saying is that real-world embodied robots will need emotional or affective systems.

Because in us humans, they filter important information from the environment and all of its vast data, PAXIL street price.

From a robot's perspective, emotion is simple:

Emotion = Thought + Meaning (Expressed as Feeling)

Emotion, or affect, highlights information that the brain has wired as being relevant to survival, BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION.

Filtering is mostly a subconscious process

Wright says:


"We're basically at any given time absorbing hundreds of millions of bits of data per second through our senses. PAXIL alternatives, We can manage this, because our conscious stream is only aware of a very tiny fraction of that sensory input, maybe a few hundred bits per second, PAXIL results. Most of our intelligence is really a filtering process. PAXIL online cod, Which of those bits are most relevant at any instant. Our sensory awareness is really much higher than we perceive."
BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION, Much of the sensory filtering process is done unconsciously.

When you're about to fall asleep for instance, the part of your brain called the thalamus slowly shuts down, purchase PAXIL online.

It filters out noise and distraction from your environment bit by bit. PAXIL photos, You don't need to be aware of that process while it's occurring, because your body just needs to fall asleep.

Emotional filtering is mostly subconscious

Many filtering processes are also driven by subconscious cognitive networks, where can i cheapest PAXIL online.

Also known as schemas and constructs, BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION. I often refer to them as: "thoughts, Is PAXIL addictive, beliefs, assumptions, and expectations."

This type of filtering is unique because it drops big hints of its existence, japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal, in the form of your emotional reactions. PAXIL forum, Emotional filtering in action

Let's say you're talking on the phone with your mother-in-law. She goes on about lots of things...



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BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION, Now, you'll likely respond more emotionally to one of her statements more so than the others...



    • Maybe you leave the call worried, About PAXIL, because you hope there's not some serious health problem preventing your mother-in-law from traveling.
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One of those statements will make the biggest impression on you -- and you'll know which one based on how you feel.

Because your emotions tell you what information is important to pay attention to, BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION.

Not based on a completely "objective" scale -- but based on the unique makeup of your cognitive networks.

Emotional filtering is intelligent

Society tells you that emotions are messy, buy generic PAXIL, stupid, Buy PAXIL from canada, hasty, and unsafe. That they're illogical and don't make sense, PAXIL without a prescription.

Your emotional reactions are simply part of your information filter.

You absolutely need this filter to know what to pay attention to BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION, . PAXIL trusted pharmacy reviews, This filtering is smart, sharp, and great at grabbing your attention, PAXIL wiki. Anger amps you up. Purchase PAXIL online no prescription, Jealously jolts your Soul. Heartbreak can shatter you. And pain can nearly drown you, BUY PAXIL NO PRESCRIPTION.

All because the information those emotions signal to is highly relevant to your well-being and survival.

And you're intelligent enough to figure out how exactly.

(When the information has been wired in a maladaptive way, meaning that your cognitive networks are bogged down by bugs... it's your job to trace your feelings back to their cognitive networks that contain dysfunctional programming which was passed on to you by others.)

What do you think?

Will Wright says that robots will need human capabilities to function in the real world, one of which is filtering important information from the environment.

My interpretation of his words is that robots will need emotions.

(And that because of that, the Singularity won't be so scary.)

Because emotions serve us well, when we just know how to use them.

What do you think.

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

WN January 25, 2010 at 12:29 pm

I’ve been thinking about the equation: Thought + Meaning = Emotion.

The biggest problem with this equation is “Meaning” because meaning comes about in so many ways. I’m a story guy and I like to think about storylines to movies and novels, about what succeeds and what doesn’t. When I get a thought, which comes to me through any of my 5 senses, a story plays out in my head about that thought. “Story” is the best word I can describe it as, and then meaning is derived from that story, much the same way we derive meaning from a movie we’ve just watched. That meaning then gives me an emotion. If the movie sucked, I’ll feel bad. If the movie was very sad, I’ll cry. If it was funny, I’ll laugh out loud. And so on.

I take meaning from the world through creation of stories. Even a person’s appearance will tell me a story that I’ll get an emotion from.

But the emotion still remains to be expressed once it is felt. That is a choice. You can choose to internalize or externalize the emotion.

Robots will also have that choice to make, but will they need to? Will a robot have boundaries? Even if the robot processed an angry emotion, will he need to express it? Will he have a need for self-preservation?

Honestly, I think a much more feasible Singularity will occur with humans surgically replacing organs with robotic ones, eventually the brain being one of those organs. These people will probably be used to solve complex problems very quickly or even used as super-soldiers.

It’s hard to imagine a through and through robot gaining sentience. What IS sentience anyway? Is it the formula above? Are humans even sentient?

There’s a brand new book I just heard of today on the radio called “The Hidden Brain.” The author suggests that not even humans are totally self-aware!

I thought of this blog when I recently read some Nietshce who talked about the Uber-mensch– the Super-Man, (or the Over-Person to be gender neutral). He really believed that humans were a bridge to a more evolved form of perfect beings. As I read this, I immediately thought, “He’s talking about robots!”

Thanks Melissa for putting that story in my head :)

Melissa Karnaze January 26, 2010 at 4:55 pm

WN,

Yes the “meaning” part of the equation is more open to interpretation, but I took it because the equation needs to be simple. I like your description of how story comes into play, story’s an important meaning-making device.

Robots will also have that choice to make, but will they need to? Will a robot have boundaries? Even if the robot processed an angry emotion, will he need to express it? Will he have a need for self-preservation? … What IS sentience anyway? Is it the formula above? Are humans even sentient?”

Excellent questions. I don’t have easy answers. :P

Honestly, I think a much more feasible Singularity will occur with humans surgically replacing organs with robotic ones, eventually the brain being one of those organs. These people will probably be used to solve complex problems very quickly or even used as super-soldiers.

It would be totally human to try and “upgrade” like this, both in helpful and harmful ways.

I thought of this blog when I recently read some Nietshce who talked about the Uber-mensch– the Super-Man, (or the Over-Person to be gender neutral). He really believed that humans were a bridge to a more evolved form of perfect beings. As I read this, I immediately thought, “He’s talking about robots!”

What a weird parallel! I get wary when people talk about perfect beings… because it usually means… unemotional. The last time I read Nietzsche talk about the Super-Man, I kept seeing the parallel to Neo. Next read, I’ll look out for robots. :)

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