BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION

by Cory Chu-Keenan

guru has a secret BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, You played follow the leader when you were young.

It’s fun when you’re a kid with no concept of self. But when you play this game as an adult -- follow the guru -- it’s called demagogy. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL steet value, It’s tempting to want to align yourself with someone who claims to have figured out this whole life thing. Maybe they’ll slip you the secret. Maybe you’ll attain their level of financial freedom, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. Maybe enlightenment is found in an e-book for blah blah blah dollars plus bonus DVD’s and an audio program.

You don’t need it, online TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL without a prescription.

Your guru doesn’t want you to be totally free because then you wouldn’t need his next product. Here are three things your self-help guru won’t tell you.

BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, 1. Online buying TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL hcl, Self-help is an oxymoron -- autonomy is where it’s at

If you’re thinking of lending a helping hand to someone in need, then by all means go for it. You just might make someone’s day, or bring a little sunshine into the world, taking TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL.

Help means that you’re helping -- someone else.

Helping yourself is scooping your own macaroni salad. There’s no warrant for congratulations here, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL images, Okay, sometimes it's necessary to help yourself by, say, learning about the symptoms of codependency so that you can stop relating to your partner in unhealthy ways, purchase TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL online. But that kind of self-help should only be temporary.

The point of self-help is not to stay in a perpetual state of needing help. Buy TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL online cod, Get the help and then move on with your life. BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, Don't let self-help become an oxymoron for you. Remember that any type of help you take is meant to get you on your feet. Self-help needs to be a tool for attaining autonomy.

Autonomy means taking care of your own needs and wants, purchase TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL for sale, and not having to continually rely on someone else’s worldview to live a great life.

If you want a guru try Socrates or Soren Kierkegaard or Harriet Tubman or Anne Frank or Sun Yat-sen or Nelson Mandela or someone else who understands autonomy and freedom.

These are people who already have legacies, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL price, coupon, Why throw your money at personalities who don’t really want to liberate you.

2. Fear and stress are good for you

People want to eliminate fear from their lives because they think it causes too much stress. Yeah, where can i cheapest TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL online, let's all go live in a shoebox.

Fear and stress are good BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, for you.

I’m not talking about irrational fear and hypertension which are topics for your medical professional. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL mg, I’m talking about the fear you feel from taking risks, and the stress you feel from the uncertainty of life.

Imagine a squirrel in the wilderness. See how he has eyes on both sides of his head so he has 180 degree peripheral vision, where can i order TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL without prescription. Notice the jerky movements exhibiting his paranoia, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. This guy has so much fear and stress that he has to shove food into the corners of his mouth, dig his claws into bark, Buy TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL no prescription, and eat his lunch on the high end of a branch.

A guru would recognize the behavior of our squirrel friend as being sadly unenlightened.

When does he take the time to clear his mind. When will he watch the sunset and marvel at the mysteries of creation?

We may be the most dominant species on Earth, TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL duration, but do we have to be the most pompous. BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, If the squirrel slowed down or let his guard down for a minute, he'd be lunch. Or road-kill. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL over the counter, Or fall out of the tree.

As a modern human, the stakes aren’t as high, but if you want to achieve what you’re going after, is TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL addictive, it may not hurt to follow the lead of Mahatma Bushytail. Because he knows the nut he’s going for and he wastes no time getting it even with the threat of swooping falcons.

You can’t predict what’s coming down the pipe, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL gel, ointment, cream, pill, spray, continuous-release, extended-release, You can only stay focused and aware so that you can deal with obstacles as they arise.

In the moment, you won’t be able to conjure up the lessons that your guru taught you at that $3,000.00 workshop, TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL maximum dosage. You’re going to have to use skills that you don’t currently have and make it work as you go along.

Just like the rest of the “unenlightened” masses. BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, If you don’t feel fear, then you won’t know how to take risks, which is a good deal of what makes a good life. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL dose, And if you don’t feel stress, you won’t grow.

So why not use that money for skydiving instead.

3, australia, uk, us, usa. Happiness isn't the goal

Too few people say to themselves, “It’s gonna feel really great when I finish this project!”

Instead, My TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL experience, we’re celebrating every time we successfully put away the groceries after a rough day at work. This is misplaced self-affirmation, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. You should already be finishing tasks, eating vegetables, doing pushups, TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL price, and all the habits necessary to lay the groundwork for the pursuit of your passion.

Instead of celebrating every little thing, Buy cheap TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL no rx, celebrate the big stuff. Finish a chapter of your novel and then see how happy you are. I’ll bet you’ll celebrate without even forcing it. BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, Speaking of novels, 19th C. novelist Charles Kingsley said:

“We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, kjøpe TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL på nett, köpa TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL online, when all we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.”

I say procrastinate. Procrastinate from buying groceries and washing your car and feeding the livestock. Where can i buy TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL online, Okay, go feed the livestock. After that, do the thing that you’re really pumped about.

Most gurus will tell you that you have to begin with peace and happiness in order to do good work, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. Peace and happiness come last, not first.

Work is supposed to suck. Especially when it’s something that you’re passionate about, because your passion should make you even more of a stickler for excellence.

After you’ve finished something, gone through the pain of overcoming obstacles along the way, then you’ll find that self-congratulation is in fine order.

You were meant to make your own way

BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION, If you really want to liberate yourself, then why go into credit card debt to get there.

70’s rocker Frank Zappa said:

“If you wind up with a boring, miserable life because you listened to your mom, your dad, your teachers, your priest, or some guy on TV telling you how to do your shit, then YOU DESERVE IT.”

And ditto for your guru.

Be like Mr. Zappa. He sure seemed to live a pretty fantastic life. And so should you, BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. But don’t do it because I told you to.

Now go buy my e-book.

About the Author: Cory Chu-Keenan wants you to have an incredible work ethic that constantly brings you joy, pride and surprises. Get inspired with his self-motivating philosophy at Sacred Sheath.

.

Similar posts: PROVERA FOR SALE. BUY BARBITAL NO PRESCRIPTION. BUY LAMICTAL NO PRESCRIPTION. Where can i find GENERIC PRILIGY DAPOXETINE online. EPIVIR interactions. LANOXIN used for.
Trackbacks from: BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. BUY TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL NO PRESCRIPTION. Taking TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL. TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL maximum dosage. Purchase TESTOSTERONE ANADOIL online.

{ 13 comments… read them below or add one }

Chris Edgar July 28, 2010 at 9:09 am

Hi Cory — what I think this piece illustrates is how diverse people’s ideas are about what self-help or personal development means. For you, in keeping with the numbered points in this article, it seems to be about (1) dependence on a guru; (2) making sure you never feel afraid; and (3) celebrating little things instead of just big accomplishments.

And, for other self-help critics, the problem is actually that personal growth teachers tell you that you have an unrealistic amount of “personal power,” and that you don’t need to depend on others (or, in some cases, the government) to get what you want. For example, Duff at Beyond Growth, at least in my interpretation, tends to focus on the “hyper-individualistic” attitude promoted by personal development teachers, which (perhaps intentionally) distracts people from the need for government redistribution of wealth. Psychologist Paul Pearsall’s The Last Self-Help Book You’ll Ever Need is all about how personal growth teaches us only to appreciate big accomplishments and not “the small stuff,” and that this sets people up for disappointment and self-blame.

Perhaps we could read this piece to say that you don’t like a particular form of self-development ideas, but others suit you better.

Melissa Karnaze July 28, 2010 at 7:10 pm

Chris, well Cory is not talking about self-help as a catch-all phrase. He’s pinning down what a self-help guru won’t tell you. Guru’s can represent the worst of the movement, and much of self-help these days is actually guru-following. Best-selling authors are in many ways gurus, but it can be hard to detect at first. And many, while appearing to motivate readers to greater independence, are just reinforcing the program to buy their latest feel-good book and borrow confidence from the guru.

Great counter-point examples, even though they aren’t directed at what the gurus typically would say. Yours and Cory’s articles go to show just how complex the self-help/personal development field is!

Cory, thanks for sharing this with us here. :)

After reading enough self-help and seeing what worked and didn’t in my own life, I started to understand these three points and my perspective on self-help changed. I gauge the good stuff by what can help you with genuine autonomy.

The swooping falcons get me every time. Great quotes too!

Cory Chu-Keenan July 28, 2010 at 10:49 pm

Chris,

Yes, self-help can mean so many different things. As I’ve mentioned before, it would be great if we could work on categorizing it so that we can speak specifically to each type, i.e., spiritual and non-spiritual, or internal locus of control vs external, etc.

This post is mostly just my observations from my own self-help experiences–observations of friends, as well as myself, getting way too codependent on the literature, and especially to guru figures. I haven’t read any of the authors you cite as self-help critics, but I don’t think I would actually agree with any of them from what you’ve revealed so far.

As Melissa said, self-help cannot be a catch-all phrase. Every idea, no matter where it originates, has to stand on its own. I think people who attempt to take on “self-help” may be just trying to cash in on the industry by playing devil’s advocate, or perhaps they have guru aspirations of their own.

Melissa,

Thanks for having me again!

Oh wow, we have another semantic conundrum with the term “guru” now. By itself, it’s not really a bad word, but the self-help industry with the help of Hollywood has definitely made it into a pejorative. I guess this post pretty much adds to the stereotype that modern-day Western gurus are regarded as charlatans and snake oil hucksters. Mostly, my intentions were just to illustrate how to break free from the advice addiction and make your own life choices–mistakes and all.

But the bigger question is, have you caught any fish yet? :)

Mianne July 29, 2010 at 12:32 am

Interesting article…

My own experience has been one that I prefer to term ‘personal growth’ rather than self help. ‘Self Help’… it is quite a strange term or concept though, isn’t it? And I agree with your points Cory.

I guess it has always been a very individual journey for me and I have never followed a ‘guru’ so to speak. I have read various books from some of the recognized ‘guru’s’, but I can’t say I’ve latched on to one that I follow religiously.

I have come to realize that although our solar system is made up of a few planets and we live on one of them, there really are about 6 1/2 billion different worlds on this one planet. …the worlds that represent each and every individuals own perception of it based on the very unique collection of our own experiences.

So how can anyone profess to being a ‘guru’ in presenting a way for other people to live, when all they have is their own perception of the world and how they live in it? Personal growth (or self help in the context of this post) should be about empowering people to find their own place on this planet while ensuring that it isn’t at the expense of other peoples perceptions. …or as Cory put it – Autonomy. The best that one person can do is to maybe help give other people some tools to unshackle themselves from the rigid confines of modern society to carve their own path.

Helping others to achieve their greatest potential should not be a self serving agenda. It isn’t something that someone can own for other people to buy. Whenever someone is asking large sums of money to be allowed to learn of their philosophies, I am instantly skeptical. They’re more in it for themselves than for other people and they attempt to make personal growth exclusive. Exclusive only to those that can afford it.

Dan Collins July 29, 2010 at 8:10 am

Cory,
I liked it – simple, concise and cogent. “If it’s going to be – it’s up to me”. All the rest is semantics. Self help Gurus can provide reminders of what we need to do and there is something to be said for that whether the message comes from Plato or Robbins. But essentially they all are saying “You create You”.
Thanks for a great post. Dan

Cory Chu-Keenan July 29, 2010 at 9:20 am

Hey Mianne,

I’m glad that you enjoyed the article. You have a truly courageous golf career. Great to see you here!

“My own experience has been one that I prefer to term ‘personal growth’ rather than self help. ‘Self Help’… it is quite a strange term or concept though, isn’t it?”

Personal growth is so much more accurate! The terms “self-help” and “guru” sound so snobby–I’m really now just realizing it in this comment thread.

“So how can anyone profess to being a ‘guru’ in presenting a way for other people to live, when all they have is their own perception of the world and how they live in it?”

You are so right. Our brains are made up of our own unique memories and experiences, and this is the content of our wisdom. No living person can profess to have a higher wisdom than the rest of us. More experience, yes. But that doesn’t guarantee a higher level of enlightenment. As you say, we are self-contained and separate universes. What a great analogy.

“The best that one person can do is to maybe help give other people some tools to unshackle themselves from the rigid confines of modern society to carve their own path.”

Society will always be rigid whether it’s 2010, 1910, or 3010. And no matter who you are, if you have the courage to live outside the status quo, there will always be the moral majority trying maintain the mass delusion of what is normal.

“Helping others to achieve their greatest potential should not be a self serving agenda.”

And that’s why I point to Socrates, Kierkegaard, et al, in the article to make the point that wisdom really cannot be packaged and UPS’ed to your doorstep. Everything important has already been said a long time ago. There really isn’t that much original stuff being said these days (with the possible exception of Stephen Colbert.)

But unfortunately, people are sold on promises rather than results. Marketing strategies have become clever manipulations that pay off, and that won’t ever disappear, just get slicker.

The solution? Follow your internal compass, think critically, speak up when the emperor has no clothes, and stop perpetuating the “messiah” archetype that gurus rely on.

Thank you for your insights, Mianne! Keep playing!!!

Dan Collins July 29, 2010 at 10:09 am

“Rigid Confines of modern society?” Hmmm
Aren’t those confines within our own minds?

Cory Chu-Keenan July 29, 2010 at 11:01 am

Hey there Dan,

I just poked around A Simple Guy and I love your inspirational quotes at the head of each post.

“Self help Gurus can provide reminders of what we need to do and there is something to be said for that whether the message comes from Plato or Robbins. But essentially they all are saying “You create You”.”

Absolutely. I think the score as neuroscience has it right now (according to David J. Linden in Accidental Brain) is that 50% of your intelligence AND personality comes from your genes. The other 50% is built from your experiences and how those experiences are stored in your memory (via dreaming).

So, while our experiences are somewhat under our control, we must also confront that the greater portion of what we deem “ourselves” is largely not under our control. Perhaps this is where the concept of co-creating with the universe comes into play.

Thanks for reading, Dan!

Melissa Karnaze July 29, 2010 at 5:24 pm

My personal take is that self-help is more trying to get out of a painful situation, and personal development is more trying to be a “better” person. I’ve noticed that most bloggers prefer the language of personal development, personal growth, self development, or self growth over self help. Yet in most bookstores I’ve been to it’s the “Self-Help” section.

“Yes, self-help can mean so many different things. As I’ve mentioned before, it would be great if we could work on categorizing it so that we can speak specifically to each type, i.e., spiritual and non-spiritual, or internal locus of control vs external, etc.”

It gets insanely complicated stratifying these belief systems! Do you have any ideas or requests for how we could elaborate a list/chart/something to start formally categorizing and sub-categorizing the field?

The way I’ve been informally categorizing the field is mostly by looking at:

How mindful each camp is of what science shows us and what it doesn’t or can’t (yet). (Spirituality is naturally included in there.)

And then the spectrum of polarization.

At the end of highly polarized are dichotomies between emotion and logic (meaning emotions are bad and logic is good), good and evil, pain and pleasure, worldly life and spirituality etc. It’s near this end that people want to kill their egos or use meditation or other techniques to essential escape their emotions and the hardships of being human. Being on this end usually leads to inner conflict and turmoil, victim hood, and the kind of needy mindset that latches easily onto the messiah. At this state, humans can behave like sheep. As a prime example is the black-and-white worldview of the Jehovah’s Witnesses.

At the end of highly integrated, dichotomies still exist, but they serve one another and are seen more as symbiotic. This comes as a result of response ability, working with your emotions, and building your life as a mindful construct. Therefore pain can be painful but simultaneously your greatest teacher, loss is also gain, weakness bears strength, negativity can be juiced for good, emotions just help you become more logical (as we talked about in the free e-class) etc. etc. etc. Individuals on this end can make peace with themselves, act on their passions, and overall exercise more integrity and be more functional and effective.

Before I get carried away, my biggest catch for the trip is here, alongside my younger brother’s!

Mianne, I really enjoyed reading your thoughtful comment!

“I have come to realize that although our solar system is made up of a few planets and we live on one of them, there really are about 6 1/2 billion different worlds on this one planet. …the worlds that represent each and every individuals own perception of it based on the very unique collection of our own experiences.

This reminds me of what I read the other day for my grad school summer reading. From, Inquiring Man: The Psychology of Personal Constructs by D. Bannister and F. Fransella:

“Each of us lives in what is ultimately a unique world, because it is uniquely interpreted and thereby uniquely experienced.”

This is why ultimately, each individual has the final say on what they need for personal growth. :) This is such a self-empowering article and discussion!

Cory Chu-Keenan July 30, 2010 at 1:48 pm

Melissa-

Okay, first off:

Holy shnikey’s! Those are some enormous fishes!!!

How are you holding that up? Did you collapse onto the floor a second later? I’m dumbfounded. Oh and by the way, you guys are a super-cute brother and sister team. :) And that boat kicks ass!

But back to the super serious brain stuff…

I really dig that “self-help” as a term means getting yourself out of a painful situation whereas self-development means growing skills or gaining experience. That’s really useful. I’m totally up for the challenge of creating a chart or something to categorize these groups and sub-groups, because right now, it’s fuzzy to me. So I know it must be for others as well.

Dan-

Most “rigid confines of society” in the industrialized West are most certainly psychological, but sometimes they’re not. Sometimes we’re born into crappy circumstances that take years and years to dig ourselves out of. Or we make mistakes when we’re young that impact us for the rest of our lives. Though I agree with you in general, there are exceptions. I think the best shot we have in life is to try to strategically position ourselves and hope for the best experiences. Society can be an obstacle or your best friend depending on what your goals are.

Haider July 31, 2010 at 1:46 am

Hi Cory,

Great article!

Many personal growth (a.k.a. “self-help”) writers encourage the idea of being seen as a “guru” or an expert, without encouraging their readers to develop the same skills they possess to develop their own understanding.

When I have religious discussions, I focus more on the reasoning behind my beliefs, rather than what my beliefs are. At the end of the day, I don’t want people to believe what I believe, or to see me as a religious reference. I want them to be able to think for themselves, and have the capacity to question what I say.

In fact, when I’m asked by someone for my opinion, I usually start off by asking for their opinion, then work my way from there.

Having said all that, its not that the “gurus” don’t want us to know the things you have pointed out. It’s that we don’t want to know them!

Why? It’s safer to rely on the knowledge of the guru, and hope that by following their “blueprint” and “secrets” we can attain the success they’ve attained. Making decisions from where we stand, looking with our own eyes, and seeing what’s relevant to us and what isn’t is a lot of hard work many of us aren’t willing to do.

We want to believe in the magical powers of the gurus to make our lives better. It’s not a conspiracy by the gurus, but wishful thinking on our part.

Cory Chu-Keenan August 2, 2010 at 9:42 am

That’s a great point, Haider! It’s not that a guru is deliberately trying to hide things from our view. He’s just (probably unconsciously) capitalizing on our natural human blindspots–delusion that someone out there has magic bullets that we just haven’t discovered yet.

I think it’s very true that most of us WANT to be led and pointed in a direction that later on we can blame someone else for pointing us in just in case it all turns to pot. Standing up and playing the role of the leader is hard work, and it comes with a lot of culpability if results turn negative.

But once you do decide to play the leader role, it feels freakin’ awesome! For me, a little bit of public speaking is the biggest rush ever, and I haven’t done a whole lot of it. I imagine what the rush must feel like for a Deepak Chopra or Chris Rock or Miley Cyrus (random examples!)

Point is, sometimes when you’re commanding such a large audience, you often lose sight of what their needs are and you just focus on yourself not sucking or just being entertaining or getting a reaction or how loud the applause is. The larger the audience, the more self-conscious you become, and the more you lose focus of how your message is supposed to help people. You’re just riding the high and feeding the frenzy after critical mass is attained.

It’s a common cliche for modern-day celebrities to say, “I’m not a role model. Don’t do what I do.” But it’s hard not to want to imitate someone who’s gained mainstream success. Too bad we don’t realize sooner that imitation equals phoniness, and it’s rather easy to spot.

On the flip side, we have characters in self-development/self-help saying, “I am totally a role model. Copy exactly what I do.” Doesn’t matter if you’re imitating Snookie or Wayne Dwyer–it comes off as inauthentic in the long run, because it proves that you aren’t:

“Making decisions from where we stand, looking with our own eyes, and seeing what’s relevant to us and what isn’t…”

Also, your article, “7 Ideas That Are Probably Ruining Your Life” http://personalgrowthmap.com/blog/2010/02/09/7-ideas-that-are-probably-ruining-your-life/

This is a great piece that compliments this article perfectly. I’d love to attempt an exhaustive list of ALL the timeless adages in self-development that are taken as canon and illustrate the counterpoints to each one.

Great insights here, Haider!

Yankee Doodle November 9, 2011 at 9:00 pm

I’m getting sick of the “it’s all your fault” mentality of self-help gurus. That whatever happens in your life is 100% your fault. Are you sick? You brought the illness onto yourself. Were you raped? It’s your fault for giving in. Blaming the victim mentality leads people to pardon the ills of society and makes people think that “people are manifesting evil into their own lives”, which thwarts responsibility to help other humans. It leads to selfishness and self-centeredness. It also leads to unrealistically high expectations one’s own abilities and subsequent disappointment when certain desires don’t manifest themselves, “I was suppose to be a millionaire by today, but I’m still poor! I need to do more meditation and visualization exercises! Maybe I didn’t do enough yoga!”

Leave a Comment

By clicking "Submit" you understand that your submission may be edited or rejected at my discretion, and/or used in upcoming articles or publications. Unconstructive criticism, personal attacks, and requests for personal advice likely will not be published. Please refer to my Disclaimer if you have any questions.

{ 3 trackbacks }